• •NOAH MANLEY STONE

•NOAH MANLEY STONE

On Sunday, September 6, the world got a little darker when Noah Manley Stone, 48, passed away after a long and cruel illness. Noah was born on November 2, 1971, to Donna L. and Jack Stone. He was a lifelong resident of Holland, Ohio.

In 1990 he graduated from Springfield High School, where he played football and competed in the JROTC Drill Team.

He married Ericka Fortner in 1997 and they have two children, Noah and Kiley.

Noah was a 21-year member of the Holland Village Council and was president for the last year. He was the third generation of the Stone family to serve the Village of Holland, following his father who was on council and his grandfather who served as mayor. He was a 28-year member of the Northern Light Masonic Lodge in Maumee. He taught himself to play the banjo and performed with various groups in the area including the Cakewalkin’ Jass Band.

For 28 of his 48 years, Noah struggled with kidney disease. Beginning in 1993, he had three kidney transplants, one from his brother John, one from his sister, Lori and one from his son, Noah. In the years between transplants, he had periods of dialysis and short term hospitalizations for various infections or kidney related issues. Instead of complaining, he tried to be positive and focus on having fun.

Mostly he loved having fun with Ericka and the kids. He loved joking around with his family and planning vacations or short adventures with them. He was a dad who never missed a sporting event, dance recital or horse riding competition. Noah coached little league soccer and baseball for little Noah and softball for Kiley. He also officiated high school football games. He was always willing to help someone or make someone laugh. His family always knew that if there was a problem, Noah would just show up to help. His life may have been short, but he brought so much happiness to his family and his community.

Noah was preceded in death by his parents, his grandparents, two brothersin-law and his father-in-law. In addition to his wife, Ericka, and children, Noah and Kiley, he is survived by his mother-in-law, Karen Fortner; his siblings: Roxanne Stone-Warr (Charlie Warr, deceased), Lori Eckel (Charlie Eckel, deceased), Jodey (Jeff) Mac-Queen, John (Jodie) Stone; special stepbrother, David Manley (Diana), and nieces and nephews, Anisa and Julianne Warr, Evelyn Warr-Cummings (Paul Omness), and Charlie (Heather) Warr, Arin (Rachel), Zach (Allison), and Spencer (Kellsey) Mac-Queen, Caitlin (Dan) Brandesky, Sally and Joe Stone.

Special thanks to Dr. Michael Rees and the ICU team at UTMC for working so hard to save Noah these last few weeks. After so many years of fighting along with Noah, they finally had to admit defeat.

In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made to the Kidney Foundation of Northwest Ohio or the Springfield High School JROTC Program.

The family received guests at the Maison-Dardenne-Walker Funeral Home, 501 Conant Street, Maumee, from 3 to 7 p.m., Friday, September 11. A Masonic service was held at 7 p.m. A private funeral service was held Saturday with Mr. Larry Manley officiating. Online condolences may be shared at walkerfuneralhomes.com

“One day in November 1971, when I got back to the dorm I had a message to call my dad. It was important. Dad told me that I had a new brother and they were going to name him Jonah. The next day, he corrected that and said his name was Noah. I was the only freshman on my floor whose mom had a baby that quarter.

This little guy, this little curly red haired imp delighted us from the day he came home from the hospital. All his sisters baby sat for him, fed him, changed his diapers and had their friends over to play with him. He was our baby doll, our toy, our entertainment, our brother. We girls taught him songs, (including the Ohio State University fight song), nursery rhymes and games. Jodey dressed him up in her majorette uniform (the sparkly one) and John taught him how to throw a football and a baseball and how to play golf. He and his buddies taught him swear words, because it was so funny how he said them. It really shook mom though when Noah dropped the Fbomb whenever he saw oranges. We never figured how that happened but he said it in FoodTown, and he said it loud.

He drove a car for the first time when he was about four. He drove it down a hill and into the motorhome. Dad asked him why he didn’t step on the brake and he said because he couldn’t reach it. After that, whenever he went to work with dad, the guys at the car dealership called him “Crash.” Noah said he didn’t like that and Dad said, “Stop wrecking their cars and maybe they’ll stop.”

He was probably the youngest little brother in Jodey’s dorm on little brother/little sister weekend. He came for the weekend with his backpack and his teddy bear.

He knew Ericka from high school and she was his soulmate. Together they made a loving home for Noah and Kiley and the many dogs, cats, chickens, goats, turtles and hamsters that also lived at 1114 Clark Street. There was never a dull moment at the Stone house and Noah loved being in the middle of the storm.

The kids grew up with dialysis equipment in their front room, and they were very conscious of how their dad felt and what they needed to do to help him. Noah, on the other hand, coached some of their sports teams, went to every event they were involved in and also the events his nieces and nephews were involved in.”

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